Foreign Banks in India: European Banks deleveraging in Asia Part II

English: Skyline of Mumbai from across Back Bay.
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According to the news flow, borrowing costs across Asia have risen upto 50%, that’ is a sizable loss on balance sheets too

where Asian swaps would have been incomplete rings and with this situation of freeze in financing however expected, those betting on Asia’s growth despite the picture of the slowdown ( not when you considered Asia in subdued growth but when you – and many did – bet on contrarian growth or that the globe did not matter )

There is no denying however that Asia will still grow at 4% and Central Asia & Africa as a region would grow albeit at its speculative trade/underdeveloped paradigm rate which was Europe’s version of an Emerging market European banks have to exit faster though if they want to be not caught in the flurry of exits. TThey will not get a penny’s worth in 3 months if deleveraging continues. Expecting banking assets to be illiquid is a readjustment that will cause such reactions in the market esp with Asian banks already suffering at the hands of repo financed Europe for a decade in Swaps and derivative contracts.

I remember AIG spent two years trying to get anyone interested in its business last time  despite profits in Asia. Credit Suisse needing to deleverage its market book is not a good sign for its advisory business. nor UBS focus on private banking / wealth as its future. Credit Agricole is shutting shop in 21 countries after losing EUR 637 mln in the latest quarter and quitting 1000 jobs in Investment Banking businesses after 850 jobs in France and 650 jobs in Consumer Finance and Factoring

In India, the costs have risen on par despite the strong ECB performance till October by the sheer drop in the rupee not the whole 20% but the one from 50 – 55 ( 54.50 today) a further 10% even as only 3-4 FCCB borrowers are out of the race. Opacity in news flows continues to trouble those with exits firmly completed though, and that is the raison d-etre of having a TV channel to shout from as the index takes the wrong ones to 45 despite R Power, Welspun , Orchid and a couple of others having exited the Dollar debt that was to be a pain and / or matched with their Export inflows

Bharti has a $12 bln of External debt in Dollars on its balance sheet which it has not swapped or hedged. Suzuki gets an import bill of almost $1.6 bln dollars. Indian Oil companies’ entire Oil imports are a huge loss to the exchequer as they have the purchases of $5-10bln every other month again unhedged and miscommunication and bank managements will have to share the blame for these treasuries’ inefficiencies
It is not clear if the INR 80 bln announced by REC as external debt is converted at current rates another $200 mln is to be issued this year maximum from dollar markets apart from a current $250 mln issue. REC Ltd has otherwise worked with very low rates and is repaying $200 mln worth Its book is Rs 1 Tln (930 bln) and new $1 billion at 8.25% may be at least a percent higher

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